Low FODMAP Ketchup Recipe

This is easy to make, easy to store, and tastes great with oven fries!

Living Happy with IBS

I’m guilty. I’m an adult and I like ketchup. I’m not sure when ketchup for adults became uncool, but I must have missed the memo. Sure, I have grown out of eating it on everything from spaghetti to sirloin, but there’s nothing like a burger and fries with ketchup.

For those on the low FODMAP diet, ketchup is one of those foods that is out due to the high fructose corn syrup. Even natural ketchup is usually out due to the addition of onion and/or garlic. I thought I would have to go without ketchup until I began experimenting and came up with this delicious low FODMAP ketchup recipe. French fries, beware.

Low FODMAP Ketchup Recipe

Low FODMAP Ketchup Recipe

Ingredients:

  • 12 oz Tomato Paste
  • 1/2 Cup Dark Brown Sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon Dry Ground Mustard
  • 1/2 teaspoon Kosher Salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon Cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon Ground Clove
  • 1/4 teaspoon Gluten Free Asafoetida Powder (

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Gutsy Broad Book Review: Allergic Girl

 

I first picked up this book a couple of years ago when I was at a desperate point with my IBS and figured that if someone could handle life with severe life threatening food allergies, they could help me handle life with multiple food intolerances.  It had such a strong, positive impact on my outlook that it was the first book I wanted to review… and I have to say, I got even more out of the book on my second read through.

 

The author is Sloane Miller, who has multiple severe allergies.  She’s also a blogger, advocate, consultant and authority on food allergies.  According to the inside of the cover, she “shows how a food-allergic person can live a life not constrained by what she or he can’t eat.”. She does this by using real-life examples (personal and from her practice) to show strategies in dealing with dietary restrictions in everyday life.

 

The book is divided into 3 parts:  You, Relationships and In and Of the World.

 

Part one is where we get to meet Sloane and find out more about her allergies.  She introduces the first one of her excellent strategies called “Team You”.  This strategy, about building a personalized medical team focussed on your needs was terribly empowering.  She follows this up with many other tips and tricks, including how to handle personal feelings of anxiety and shame.

 

Part 3 is about Relationships and she does an excellent job in outlining the various reactions that family members and others can have when you disclose your dietary needs, and how to handle these reactions with grace and strength.

 

She covers a lot of territory, from college room-mates, to first dates to family and work events.  All of her suggestions are practical, doable and empowering (even though some require a bit of practice, I find).

 

I very much appreciated her chapter on finding new ways of looking at food.  “Food is not the enemy”, gave me an Ah-Ha! moment and freed me from continuously waging war with dairy, when there was no way I could win.

 

Part 3 is called “In and Of the World” and provides an endless supply of ideas, tips and tricks and suggestions for surviving parties, celebrations, restaurant invitations and travel.

 

This book is a real primer on how to live with dietary restrictions.  Sloane writes with humour, but you know that she’s had some scary experiences.  Though her style is informal, she still shows how she is confidently certain that dietary challenges are totally compatible with living well. 

 

Resources listed in the back are comprehensive, mostly American but with some Canadian resources thrown in for good measure.

 

This book totally enthused me.  It gave me the confidence to try the techniques she recommends for managing her allergies.  This should be required reading for everyone with dietary allergies and intolerances.  Check out her blog and website too!

 

Details:

Allergic Girl By Sloane Miller

Published 2011 by John Wiley and Sons Inc.

About 250 pages

ISBN 978-0-470-63000-9

 

Gutsy Broad’s Simple Summer Lunch Salad

I started following the FODMAP diet in the winter and as the weather changes I’m finding that I have to scramble to find something suitable for warm days.  This has become one of my fast, go-to lunches –  I usually have the ingredients on hand and it’s simple to prepare.  

 

This FODMAP friendly recipe serves 1, but can easily be doubled (or more!).  I’m planning on packing it for a lunch at work this week, will probably throw a frozen juice box to sit beside the salad so I don’t have to worry about the tuna going bad. 

Gutsy Broad’s Simple Summer Lunch Salad

 

  • ·        ½ can chunked or flaked tuna, drained (I usually save the other half for another salad later in the week)
  • ·        1 medium tomato diced (picked up from a farmers market or your garden will improve the taste immensely)
  • ·        Bowl of shredded lettuce, any kind or blend (that is FODMAP friendly).  (I like to chop mine into little bits – I hate trying to awkwardly fit an entire leaf in my mouth.) 
  • ·        Salt and pepper
  • ·        Olive oil – the best quality you can afford.  I have a small bottle of expensive olive oil that only I can use, and just for this salad.

 

I basically combine the ingredients, drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle salt and pepper on to taste.  Don’t drizzle or sprinkle too lightly – think of how much salad dressing you’d normally toss a salad with.   I don’t like eating cold salad, and have even warmed the tuna slightly in the microwave first.  There’s no carbs in this recipe, but I usually have enough with breakfast or dinner, so missing out at lunch is no big deal. 

 

My Top 10 Ingredients (that I always have in my pantry)

 

 

When I started out trying to follow the FODMAP diet I had already identified a few foods that I needed to replace or learn to live without.  However, as I started to get better at reading labels I was totally blown away by how many processed products have hidden ingredients.   I love cooking, but I hate the hassle of always having to read labels and always having to prepare something from scratch. 

 

These items represent the safest of my safe list.  I almost always have them in my pantry cupboard – if you are starting out on a FODMAP diet, take the time to find these items in a store, clear a shelf and start your ‘safe shelf’:

 

Top 10 Ingredients that I always have in my pantry:

 

1:  Olive oil

2:  Salt and Pepper

3:  Peanut Butter

4:  Rice pasta

5:  Egg Replacer

6:  GF cake mix

7:  Canned Tuna

8:  Quinoa

9:  Rice

10:  Aylmer Accents Fire Roasted diced tomatoes (no garlic!)

 

 

You will note that there aren’t any items that would be kept in the fridge or in the fruit bowl.  That’s another time.   I probably will get some flack for putting in the Gluten Free cake mix, but I gotta have something sweet from time to time. 

 

Good heavens… this really is the most boring ingredient list in the history of ingredient lists…!  Obviously I need to break out of my shell and try a few new products….

 

 

Foods that Make my Gut Angry

 

 

I was thinking that I would share with you what foods I’m currently avoiding because they give my digestive system a hassle.  I’m technically on the challenge phase of the FODMAP diet, but I’m finding life so enjoyable without IBS symptoms that I’ve been reluctant to risk getting sick again – it’s easier (for me) to avoid everything and feel good!

 

Food Intolerances:

 

DAIRY:  My system cannot tolerate any amount of bovine dairy, in any form.  It’s more than just a fermentable issue with me – the smallest amount of even the ‘safe’ dairy (american cheese, parmesan, yogurt) will send me running to the washroom with watery diarrhea within a half hour (usually sooner).  I’m lucky that I can tolerate goats milk and related products (different protein makeup), so this has taken the sting out of loosing this food group.

 

EGGS:  My IgE blood panel tells me that it’s just the egg whites that my system reacts to.  However, this reaction is so strong (intense headache, fatigue, bowel discomfort) that I have written off all egg products. 

 

BEEF:  Eating a steak will result in me staying awake all night as I suffer through every groan, cramp, twinge and strain of my gut trying to break this meat down.  I can have a bite of steak (my husband is pretty good about sharing), but I haven’t chanced much more than that.

 

STRAWBERRIES:  Eating a few of these has me running to the bathroom with diarrhea and cramping within a few hours.

 

And FODMAPS.  FODMAP stands for Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides and Polyols – the carbohydrates that are malabsorbed in my intestine.  I get very confused as to what an Oligo vs Fructan vs Fructose are, so bear with me…

OLIGOSACCHARIDES:  My excellent FODMAP App from Monash University tells me that fructans and galactos are in this group (FOS and GOS for short).  Vegetables like garlic, legumes and onions are listed.  Fruit like nectarines, peaches, apples and watermelon are included.  Grains like barley, rye, wheat are included.  Nuts like cashews and pistachios are included too.  This carbohydrate is also disguised as inulin on ingredient listings. 

I definitely have trouble with garlic and onion.  Apples are out for me.  I haven’t really challenged the rest.  The Monash FODMAP app helpfully lists some foods that have moderate Oligos-fructan/FOS and or GOS  – I’ve been avoiding these so maybe it’s time to try and start my food challenge with these items.  I know a serving of broccoli (listed on the app as having ‘moderate Oligos -fructan/FOS and or GOS’), at dinner doesn’t upset me too much.

DISACCHARIDES: lactose (dairy).  I stay away from all dairy, not sure if it’s an intensive reaction to the carbohydrate or the protein (casein).  Dairy causes my most immediate, intense reaction.

MONOSACCHARIDES:  one molecule sugars.  Glucose, fructose and galactose (lactose) are here. Honey, high fructose corn syrup, and fruits like apples and mangos are included.  I know honey and apples mess me up, so I’ve been avoiding these too.

POLYOLS: Polyols are sugar alcohols.  Sorbitol and mannitol (found in some fruits and vegetables and often found as artificial sweeteners) are some of these.  Cauliflower, mushrooms, snowpeas, peaches, watermelon are listed as having high mannitol levels, and I have been avoiding them. I know that giving up gum was one of the things that helped alleviate my symptoms so the artificial sweeteners are obviously a problem for me.

So, in a nutshell, most food makes my tummy grouchy.  This leaves me with limited options as far as cooking goes – most helpful ‘low FODMAP’ recipes are out for me (or need a lot of adjusting) because they will include eggs or dairy of some kind.

Watch for my next posting, where I list the Top 10 ingredients that I keep in my pantry. 

Fire Roasted Pasta and Sauce

Ok, this is my first experience blogging with a recipe – let’s see if I can get the ingredients right!  This is a go-to recipe for me when I want something flavourful, but easy on the tummy.  If my gut is giving me trouble, this is the first dinner I make to calm IBS symptoms down.  Originally a Weight Watchers recipe, I’ve heavily adjusted it so that it is FODMAP friendly.

Fire Roasted Pasta and Sauce

Serves 2-3 people

Time to prepare: about 30 minutes

 1 package ground turkey

  • 2 – 3 Tbsp olive oil
  • Salt and Pepper
  • 1 can fire roasted tomatoes (check the can ingredients listing  to make sure that’s the only ingredient as onion and garlic is commonly added)
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • Rice pasta – I cook the entire 340g package of Tinkyada rice pasta and refrigerate leftovers.

 

Here’s a photo of the ingredients, all laid out.  Don’t worry if your can of fire roasted tomatoes is bigger, or if you  have slightly more ground turkey than specified.  It’s one of those recipes where you can’t really mess up.

  Chicken Pasta ingredients

Instructions:

  • Start the water for pasta.  Cook pasta while preparing sauce.
  • Brown turkey in olive oil – make sure the meat is starting to get crispy brown as this adds flavour.  Season with Salt and Pepper.
  • Add fire roasted tomatoes.  The husband isn’t a fan of chunky bits of tomatoes, so I add half the can as is, and then use my wand blender on the remainder in the can to make it more ‘saucey’.  I stir this in too.
  • Add Cumin, stir and sauté.  When pasta is done, serve.

 Chicken Pasta done

And that’s it!  Simple, yummy and FODMAP friendly – what more can you ask for?  Oh yeah! – The leftovers are great too – I’ll often double the recipe to make sure there are leftovers in the fridge for weekday lunches.

My IBS Journey, Phase 3

Remember how I said that removing the foods on the food panel blood test made me feel better?  Well, that lasted.  For about 3 months.

And then the symptoms came back again.  Slowly at first, and during the month of December. You know – the time of year where there is food everywhere.  Beautiful food.  Special food.  So delicious food. 

So at first, I didn’t know if I was truly getting worse, or just ‘accidentally’ eating foods on my forbidden list. 

But, my cramping and bloating and dashes to the bathroom were becoming more frequent.  By the time Christmas actually arrived, I was scared to eat anything.  We were spending Christmas at my Mom and Dad’s place – and my mom is a great cook.  No, scratch that – she’s an amazing cook.  She was so worried about making me sick, but I simply had too many forbidden foods for her to remember. 

And, on top of that, we were flying to go visit them. 

Now, I should mention that the symptoms weren’t really, really bad here.  I just felt tired, with weird bowel movements, lots of bloating and cramping.  Weird enough for me not to trust being on a plane without a good dose of pepto bismol to keep any surprise diarrhea under control. 

In January, I tried to talk rationally to myself.  I hate always feeling yukky.  I’m a ‘suck it up, buttercup’ kind of gal.  I’m not THAT sick, right?  So I started a ‘feeling’ diary – where I just wrote down the date, and a short comment on how the day went.  ‘Good’ if I had a good day, HLHS if I had a headache on my left hand side, BMx4, runny (4 bowel movements, runny), that sort of thing.  At the end of the month I looked back:  There was only one day where the entry said ‘Good’. 

I can’t live like this.  What to do?

I tried my Doctor again: I just got the sad look and an offer to book me in for allergy testing.  I was pretty sure I didn’t have allergies, but put myself on the waiting list.

I  contacted my naturopath and reviewed my food and symptom diaries.  I confirmed that I was  taking the expensive probiotics.  Yes, I was also taking the right fiber supplements.  Yes, I was (now) avoiding the forbidden foods.  I could tell the naturopath was stumped.

It turns out that my girlfriend has a naturopath who suggests smelly powders and potions.  Have you ever heard of Slippery Elm and Marshmallow Root?  My friend swears by this combination.  I mentioned this to the naturopath and she said it couldn’t hurt (but she did look doubtful that it would help).  I purchased some at my local supplement store and tried them – I think they are just a ‘natural’ alternative to pepto bismol.  They helped a bit with the diarrhea, but they aren’t as effective as pepto bismol.   

The couple at my local health supplement store recommended a special fiber supplement.  I was desperate enough to buy it.  It ain’t cheap, and  this stuff not only tastes, really, really bad, but it stinks to high heaven.  Do I really need to do all this just to feel ‘normal’?

And that’s when I got my February/March issue of Living Without.  Inside was an article about researchers at the Monash University in Australia who were studying IBS and investigating something called FODMAPs.  I was encouraged to see that their work was the result of actual research!  Included in the article was a small box, listing common foods to avoid and foods to enjoy.  I ripped it out and stuck it to the refrigerator.

What the hell, I thought.  Let’s give it a try.  At this point I was desperate – I had a heating pad on my belly every evening trying to calm the pain.  And every morning was spent with repeated trips to the bathroom.  The new diet was worth a try.

The results were almost immediate.  The bloating went away.  The cramps went away.  And, thanks to the researchers at Monash University, the diarrhea went away too. 

I’ve been following a FODMAP diet for a little while now, but it seems longer – I think because my days are so full – of doing things in the real world!  I’m not continually stuck in the bathroom, or sacked out on the couch with a headache, or walking around painfully with a belly that looks like I’m 8 months pregnant.

Yes, there have been bumps along the way.  I know that my other attempts at a ‘cure’ only lasted for a little while – so I am a bit nervous that this good thing won’t last.  But I sure will enjoy it while it does!